Roberta Bacic "Meeting Chilean arpilleras"

ここでは、「Roberta Bacic "Meeting Chilean arpilleras" 」 に関する記事を紹介しています。
Meeting Chilean arpilleras

Voices of solidarity speak to us when looking into the history of this collection of arpilleras that reside in Oshima Hakko Museum and others that live in Japan and around and beyond.
Arpilleras (pronounced "ar-pee-air-ahs") are three-dimensional appliquéd textiles from Latin America, originating as a Chilean folk craft. From the first, pieces of strong hessian fabric (called ‘arpillera’ in Spanish) were used as the backing and that word became the name for this particular type of tapestry. The images are done using scraps of materials, threads and a needle and all is hand sewn. Violeta Parra, the well-known Chilean folk singer made arpilleras at a time she could not sing and brought them to Paris in the late 1960s; they showed scenes of Chilean history and also illustrated characters. ‘Bordadoras de Isla Negra’ also influenced the arpilleristas as they stitched in bright colours bucolic scenes of their peasant lives.
In the context of systematic human rights violations under the Pinochet dictatorship in Chile between 11 September 1973 and March 1990, this style of sewing developed into an act of political subversion and a way to raise international awareness of the violence and repression. Their influence is now threaded through arpilleras produced in other countries of Latin America, Africa and Europe.
The Japanese Committee for Solidarity with the People of Chile was established in February 1974 and dissolved in April 1991. It started to buy, promote and commercialize arpilleras in 1988. The ones presently on exhibit at this museum belong to those times. Professor  
Masaaki Takahashi, who owns a personal collection, has written about this. He is a source of memory for this collection and the solidarity project. In 2009, many years after the committee ceased its activity, Professor Takahashi donated these arpilleras to Oshima Hakko Museum.
Through the simple activity of sewing, women, whether working individually or as a group, remember, bear witness to, resist and denounce the atrocities they have lived. Thus their sewing, a traditional domestic activity, becomes a powerful act of resistance, testimony and a mechanism for spreading that message of resistance worldwide.
In the foreword to Tapestries of Hope, Threads of Love: The Arpillera Movement in Chile 1974 – 1994 by Marjorie Agosín (1996), Isabel Allende says: “With leftovers of fabric and simple stitches, the women embroidered what could not be told in words, and thus the arpilleras became a powerful form of political resistance.” Marjorie Agosín herself says: “The arpilleras flourished in the midst of a silent nation, and from the inner patios of churches and poor neighbourhoods, stories made of cloth and yarn narrated what was forbidden.”
The simple act of appreciating and buying these pieces also had a powerful effect. The Japanese Committee for Solidarity was not alone, and many other groups from different parts of the world, also connected to the arpilleristas and supported their work. Their motivation was sometimes political and ideological as in Japan, sometimes humanitarian and sometimes religious. But in all cases these voices of solidarity stood beside the women to remember, bear witness, to resist and denounce the atrocities. It is also important to say that the arpilleras were a means of economic survival for the arpilleristas and played an important role in strengthening and empowering the women and building global opposition to the Pinochet regime.
Arpilleras often also have a ’relief’ quality for the makers while powerfully connecting the issues they portray to the viewers and inviting them to respond and express their own concerns. The scrap material and stitching, which create the simple, clear lines and forms of the figures and motifs -- often three-dimensional -- allow the viewer to comprehend and appreciate the determination of these Latin American sewer artists and lets the women feel that they have a voice which empowers them.
This exhibition features arpilleras in their politicised form. Perhaps it is the surprisingly complex depth of emotion articulated by an apparently simple visual style that makes the appeal of the arpilleras strong and their language universal.
I invite you to respond to this exhibit with your mind and your heart, and perhaps with stitches of your own; at this time when we mark 40 years since the military cup d’état.

Roberta Bacic
Chilean Curator of arpilleras
May 2013
www.cain.ulst.ac.uk/quilts

大島博光記念館 企画展「チリのキルト=アルピジェラに出会う」
序 文

大島博光記念館にあるこのコレクション、および日本内外のその他の場所にあるアルピジェラの歴史を見つめるとき、連帯の声がわたしたちに向けて語りかけてきます。
アルピジェラ(arpillera)はラテンアメリカの三次元のアップリケの裁縫作品で、もとはチリの民芸品です。当初から丈夫な麻の厚布を裏布として用いており、その裏布をさす語(スペイン語でarpillera)がこのタペストリー自体の呼び名ともなりました。端切れと糸と針を用い、すべて手縫いで描き出されている作品です。チリの有名なフォーク歌手、ヴィオレタ・パラには歌うことのできなかった時期がありました。パラはこのときアルピジェラ作品を作り、1960年代後半にパリに持ってゆきました。パラの作品には、チリの歴史のいくつかの場面と人物を見ることができます。農民の暮らす田園風景を色鮮やかなステッチで描いた「イスラ・ネグラの刺繍作品」もまた、アルピジェラ作家たちに影響を与えています。
1973年9月11日から1990年3月まで続くチリのピノチェト独裁体制による組織的な人権侵害の文脈のなかで、この裁縫のスタイルは政治的な抵抗行動の技法であり暴力と抑圧について国際的な意識を高める技法でもあるものへと発展していきました。その影響力は大きく、ラテンアメリカ、アフリカ、あるいはヨーロッパの他の国でも現在アルピジェラが縫われ、作られるに至っています。
チリ人民連帯日本委員会は1974年2月に結成され、1991年4月に解散した団体です。この委員会は1988年にアルピジェラの購入と普及活動、販売を開始しました。大島博光記念館で現在展示されている作品は、この時期に作られたものです。アルピジェラの個人コレクションを自分でも所有する高橋正明氏がこの経緯を書き記しています(訳注:『チリ・嵐にざわめく民衆の木よ』大月書店、1990年)。高橋氏はここに展示されているコレクションと連帯活動の記憶の源であるといえるでしょう。連帯委員会が活動を終えてしばらくの後、2009年、高橋氏はここにあるアルピジェラを大島博光記念館に寄贈しました。
個人で作業をするにせよ、グループで作り上げるにせよ、女性たちは縫い物というシンプルな手段を通じ、自分たちの生きてきた残酷な経験を記憶し、証言し、抵抗し、告発しています。こうして伝統的な家庭の仕事であった裁縫は、抵抗と証言の力強い行動となり、世界中にその抵抗のメッセージを伝える装置ともなっていったのです。
マージョリー・アゴシン著の『希望のタペストリー、愛の糸:チリのアルピジェラ運動 1974-1994年』(Tapestries of Hope, Threads of Love: The Arpillera Movement in Chile 1974 – 1994, 1996年出版)によせた序文でイザベル・アジェンデは以下のように描いています。「使い古しの生地と素朴なステッチを用いて、女性たちは言葉にできないものを刺繍にしていった。そうしてアルピジェラは力強い政治抵抗の方法となったのである。」マージョリー・アゴシンによる本文にも次のようにあります。「アルピジェラは沈黙する国民のただなかから咲き出てきたのであり、布と糸で作られた物語が、禁じられた事柄を教会の中庭と貧民地区から物語ったのである。」
これらの作品に価値を見いだし購入するという行動も、それだけで大きな効果をもっていました。チリ人民連帯日本委員会のみならず、世界の他の地域の多くの団体が、アルピジェラと関係し、アルピジェラ作りを支援しました。その動機は、日本の連帯委員会がそうであったように、時には政治的、イデオロギー的なものであり、時には人道的であったり宗教的なものでもありました。けれどもいずれの場合においても彼らは、その連帯の声でもって作り手の女性たちのかたわらに立ち、残虐な行いを記憶し、証言し、抵抗し、告発しようとしてきました。またアルピジェラによって作り手たちが生き延びるための経済的手段をえたことも記しておかなければなりません。アルピジェラは彼女たちを勇気づけ、彼女たちに機会を与え、ピノチェト政権に対する抗議の声を世界で打ち立てていくために貢献したのです。
アルピジェラはしばしば作り手たちの「苦痛をやわらげる」性質をもっています。その一方で、見る者を作品に描かれている問題に深く接続し、それに対し応答するよう、そして自分自身の事柄として何かを表現していくよう導きます。素朴ではっきりとした輪郭と形状の人物やモチーフ—しばしば三次元で表現されます—を作り上げている端切れとステッチによって、作品を見る者は、ラテンアメリカの裁縫作家たちの決意を理解し評価することができるようになります。そして作り手の女性たちは、自分が力ある声をもっていると感じることができるのです。
この展覧会は、政治的な形態をとったアルピジェラに焦点をあてています。驚くほど複雑で深さをもった感情が一見すると素朴なスタイルで表現されていることによって、おそらくアルピジェラは人びとに力強く訴えかけ、普遍的な言葉をもつものとなっているのでしょう。
この展覧会に対しあなた自身の心と魂で、そして願わくばあなた自身の縫いものを通じて応答してほしい。チリの軍事クーデターから40年を数える今、わたしはそう願っています。

2013年5月
チリ出身のアルピジェラ・キュレーター
ロベルタ・バシック
www.cain.ulst.ac.uk/quilts

(英文和訳 酒井朋子)
関連記事
コメント
この記事へのコメント
コメントを投稿する
URL:
Comment:
Pass:
秘密: 管理者にだけ表示を許可する
 
トラックバック
この記事のトラックバックURL
http://oshimahakkou.blog44.fc2.com/tb.php/1765-0da49218
この記事にトラックバックする(FC2ブログユーザー)
この記事へのトラックバック